TRINET - FIBER-OPTIC MIDDLE MILE NETWORK

"Recently I met with a group that has submitted for a Triumph fiber project that would connect all 8 counties and open up opportunities for commerce, education and connectivity in our region plus provide a competitive advantage into the future. My excitement for the project is due to the fact that all of us participate and all of us will be linked together. Anything that strengthens the entire region will help all of us"

Commissioner Grover C. Robinson, Escambia County, Florida

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Click on the image below to view an interactive Google map, you can choose to view different layers of information and pan and zoom to see the full details.

 
 
 

TriNet is a 670-mile network that spans each of the 8 Triumph counties. Our initial application is for $600,000 to accomplish detailed planning and engineering. The total estimated cost to build and light the network is estimated at between 40 to 60 million dollars. TriNet as envisioned will build into each County’s school district central office and utilize existing network capacity to reach into each school. This will enable the development of a 230+ school secure intranet to support any current or future educational technology and provide room for expansion of our university and college innovations. TriNet will also put us in great position to increase our regional cyber-security capabilities.

TriNet will offer dark fiber to both the School Districts and the County Commissions in each of the 8 Triumph counties for their desired use. This will allow each County the flexibility to capitalize on this infrastructure in numerous ways, as an expansion of their own networks or perhaps as a revenue generator.

TriNet is designed to encourage the expansion of high-speed Internet within under-served and rural areas of each county and will provide seamless integration with future networks that may be built in the Florida Northwest Rural Areas of Opportunity counties. An important benefit of this is using Telehealth to expand access and improve the quality of rural healthcare.

Leasing fiber to both existing and new Internet service providers will help the Gulf Coast lead the nation in affordable multi-gigabit Internet while also making TriNet financially sustainable. You can view an interactive Google map by clicking on the image below.

 

 

TriNet will provide ultra-high-speed and secure connectivity to every school, college and university in the Triumph counties.

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K-20 Educational Intranet

The K-20 Intranet is a dedicated network that connects every school, college or University to each other. Because this is a private network connection the throughput can be extremely high (100 Gbps) in many cases and very secure and can support protocols and services such as Quality-of-Service(QoS) that is not possible over the public Internet. This will allow the Gulf Coast region to create educational technology (EdTech) innovations and capitalize on the latest innovations from other places.

This last October (2017) Bill Gates announced that the Gates Foundation will shift it's educational focus "...toward supporting innovations within schools that have joined together in collaborative networks." 

Of the $1.7 billion that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged to public education over the next five years, the majority will go toward supporting innovations within schools that have joined together in collaborative networks. “Big bets” in innovation will receive 25 percent of funding, Gates said. He cited education research as one of the most underfunded of any subject area. Advancements like artificial intelligence should be expanded throughout a school day to make learning fun, Gates said. Link to full article.

Research & Education Networks

 The Global Integrated Lambda Facility - Light paths for e-science   Acknowledgements  - The Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) Map 2017 visualization was created by Robert Patterson of the  Advanced Visualization Laboratory (AVL)  at the  National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA)  at the  University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) , using an Earth image provided by  NASA  with texture retouching by Jeff Carpenter, NCSA. Data was compiled by Maxine D. Brown of the  Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL)  at the  University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) . Support was provided by GLIF, NCSA/UIUC, and the State of Illinois. For more information on GLIF, see  http://www.glif.is/ .

The Global Integrated Lambda Facility - Light paths for e-science

Acknowledgements - The Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF) Map 2017 visualization was created by Robert Patterson of the Advanced Visualization Laboratory (AVL) at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), using an Earth image provided by NASA with texture retouching by Jeff Carpenter, NCSA. Data was compiled by Maxine D. Brown of the Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Support was provided by GLIF, NCSA/UIUC, and the State of Illinois. For more information on GLIF, see http://www.glif.is/.

TriNet will also support connectivity to Research & Education networks such as the Florida LambdaRail, Internet2 and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility (GLIF).

The main application drivers for these new 'application-empowered' networks are high-performance e-science projects. E-science consists of very large-scale applications - such as high-energy physics, astronomy, earth science, bio-informatics and the environmental sciences - that study very complex micro- to macro-scale problems over time and space. In the future, these networks will conceivably also be taken up in other application domains, including education, emergency services, health services and commerce.

In the coming decade, e-science will require distributed petaops computing, exabyte storage, and terabit networks. TriNet is designed to make the Florida Gulf Coast ready for this terabit network future.

Some recent uses...

Cross-institutional Nanotechnology STEM Education and Workforce Training

Result: Brings high-end laboratory environments to high school and college students via alternative delivery methods that provide interactive nanotechnology laboratory experiences.

Investigating patterns of precipitation change as a result of global climate change, and projecting future precipitation changes

Result: Rapidly and accurately moves massive climate study data to a Supercomputer Center for remote processing and analysis.

Support world-class materials characterization research by enabling remote access and manipulation of instrumentation for Electron Microscopy and Analysis (CEMAS)

Result: Efficiently and productively share highly scarce scientific instruments via an ultra high speed/low latency network connection.

Key to making the gulf coast economically attractive is the creation of the Innovation Region.

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In addition to the K-20 Internet, TriNet will foster the growth of the Innovation Region by building into Innovation Places as they are identified along the Gulf Coast. Several of the Innovation Places are part of different educational institutions and others can be located in urban in-fill areas such as mid-town Pensacola and others possibly located in re-purposed big box stores. One tremendous advantage this provides is that prospective businesses can locate along the gulf coast and enjoy the ultra-high speed and affordable connectivity from TriNet and Economic Development groups may also better cooperate in luring business relocations by using the unique offering this network can provide.

According to information from the Brookings Institution:

"Although innovation districts are largely unplanned and organic, they do require three critical areas of physical investments: transit, broadband, and bicycle/pedestrian facilities.
All these three areas of infrastructure can—and should—also be extended into adjacent, often low-income neighborhoods, to both reduce the digital divide and improve transportation accessibility to jobs and economic opportunity.
But unlike simplistic notions of transit-oriented development, in no case is infrastructure the driver of the innovation district. It’s not the field of dreams. If you just build transit, broadband, and bike/ped, it doesn’t mean the innovation district will come. Community leaders have to understand their key innovation assets and literally build around those. The infrastructure required arises from those strengths."

Be sure to check out our information on establishing an Innovation District on the Gulf Coast.

Chattanooga, TN has many of these assets in place including a great fiber-optic network and an Innovation District.

Here is some news from Chattanooga starting with their current Internet costs.

 Prices for Internet service in Chattanooga, TN.

Prices for Internet service in Chattanooga, TN.

Ed. Marston, vice president of the Electric Power Board in Chattanooga, tells David Thomas of the Jackson Sun. “Like many places, Chattanooga has had some entrepreneurial activity, but it has just exploded in a positive way. New companies have moved to Chattanooga, and a lot of investors, outside investors, are looking at Chattanooga.” In particular, the service helps make Tennessee cities more attractive to site selectors, which increasingly consider gigabit Internet, Thomas adds.
The city’s advanced internet technology is already expanding the job market.  HomeServe USA, a provider of emergency home repair programs, increased its staff to 140 employees at its call center in the Chattanooga area, which it directly attributed to the availability of gigabit Internet there. Another Tennessee company, Claris Networks, moved its data center from Knoxville to Chattanooga specifically to take advantage of its fiber network.
The start-up scene in Chattanooga is also taking off, with more than 1,000 new jobs being created since the city began offering ultra-speed Internet service in 2009, Thomas writes. The high-speed Internet service also helped Chattanooga become the first midsize city to set up its own “Innovation District,” which clusters talent, startups, established firms, nonprofits, and cultural assets to incubate creativity and serve as labs for far-reaching concepts and policies to harness new ideas and technologies, writes Brooks Rainwater in Tech Insider.